Visitor Information

Liberty County, in the heart of Northwest Florida, is a county where businesses and the people who make them work can enjoy an environment and lifestyle unlike any other in the state.

A world apart, but within easy reach, Liberty County prides itself on preserving some of Florida’s most precious natural and historical resources. And the people of Liberty County pride themselves on having a vibrant vision for the economic future of its residents and the businesses that call Liberty home.

A History of Liberty County, Florida

Liberty County was established on December 15, 1855, paying homage, by its name, to the sentiment of the American people. It was created from the southern part of Gadsden County. The 1860 census listed the County with a population of about 1,500 people. At that time Bristol, the County seat, was a town forty-six years old, yet it had a population of only about 150.

The earliest known culture of people in the Liberty County area were the Apalachee Indians. Old Indian mounds and pieces of pottery can still be found here which is a true sign that the Indians first lived here. Six of these mounds were excavated to some extent, and it is estimated that they date back to the early 1200's.

Liberty County was part of the territory included in Forbes Grant, 1803. Forbes was a British trader and maintained trading posts on the Apalachicola River. When Florida became a territory of the United States, pioneers from Georgia and the Carolinas settled this area because of the good farm land.

During the Civil War the swamps bordering the Apalachicola and Ochlockonee Rivers furnished a haven for a good many deserters. There were no battles within the county, but Confederate forces maintained battle emplacements on the banks above the Apalachicola River and strived to defend the river from the Union Army.

An Ever Expanding Region of Community, Nature and Industry

Nestled between two rivers, the Ochlockonee on the east and the Apalachicola on the west, Liberty County is located between Florida’s capital city of Tallahassee and the coastal community of Panama City. In planning for its future, this community actively works in public/private partnership with local and regional organizations. The result is a region whose natural assets – vast areas of forest, rivers and lakes – are complemented by a growing array of business assets.

Although it maintains a relatively low profile, Liberty County offers a surprising and uniquely advantageous blend of two worlds – a sprawling, natural wonderland in the heart of the Apalachicola National Forest that is just minutes away from some of Florida's most sought-after high technology resources.

Wise businesses are discovering ways to leverage funding and resources with such top research institutions as Florida State University, Florida A&M University and the University of Florida. Liberty County, less than an hour's drive from two of Florida's premier universities, makes it easy to access leading-edge technologies that have gained worldwide attention.

The Perfect Florida Location for Work & Living

Situated equally between the booming urban centers of Tallahassee and Panama City, Liberty County remains relatively untouched. Today, this is a fertile land of economic opportunity where businesses can thrive and employees can enjoy a lifestyle unlike any other. Although it maintains a relatively low profile, Liberty County offers a surprising and uniquely advantageous blend of two worlds – a sprawling, natural wonderland in the heart of the Apalachicola National Forest that is just minutes away from some of Florida's most sought-after high technology resources.

The Business Environment in Liberty County offers business and lifestyle opportunities that are truly unique. The county's assets include a strong public-private support for business relocation, easy access to North Florida, Alabama and Georgia markets, development incentives, and a highly-trained regional labor force. Liberty County also offers a wide range of tax incentives to businesses that locate and create new jobs within its Rural Enterprise Zone.

Education in Liberty County's public schools consistently perform well and rank above average on state mandated achievement tests. The county is well served by nearby Chipola College and Tallahassee Community College, both of which provide a range of various degrees. Technical training is provided through Chipola Workforce Development Program and Lively Technical Center.

The Climate in Liberty County is mild with an average temperature of 67.9 degrees. The coldest month is December with an average annual temperature of 53.2 degrees. While July is the warmest month with an average temperature of 81.8 degrees. The annual rainfall in the area is 58.62 inches.

Our Regional Infrastructure in the heart of the booming Northwest Florida region, Liberty County boasts quick and easy access to the state's transportation networks. Crisscrossed by well-maintained roads and highways, the county quickly links businesses to Florida's and the country's Interstate system. The major east-west highway is State Road 20, which connects Liberty County to Panama City and Tallahassee, both approximately 45 miles away. State Road 12 provides a quick link to Interstate 10 and U.S. 90 to the north. The AN Railroad, a class 11 carrier, travels north-south through the county. Its principal terminal is in Port St. Joe and it joins CSX Railroad at Chattahoochee to the north. Convenient commercial air service is available in Tallahassee and Panama City, both approximately 45 miles from Bristol, the county seat.

Liberty County Makes Education Our Priority

In Liberty County, we believe access to quality educational opportunities for our children and our workforce is an important priority. Over time, we have developed a collection of public schools that consistently perform well and rank above average on state mandated achievement tests.

The people of Liberty County remain committed to providing a school system that provides balanced, high quality education programs and opportunities for our families, businesses, and our growing workforce.

Liberty County Public Schools

  • Tolar Elementary and Middle School
  • Hosford Elementary and Junior High School
  • Liberty County High School

Community Colleges (30-45 minute drive)

  • Chipola Junior College
  • Tallahassee Community College

Vocational/Technical Centers

  • Chipola Workforce Development Program
  • Lively Technical Center

Workforce Assistance

The Chipola Regional Work Force Board offers valuable services to employers, including assistance with recruitment, training, labor market information and financial incentives. To review these services, visit www.onestopahead.com.

Websites of Interest

Liberty County is an amazing county filled with nearby attractions and services. Below are links to websites of interest within Liberty County.

Veterans Memorial Railroad

Liberty County Florida Arts Council

Torreya State Park

The Calhoun Liberty Journal (news)

Liberty County Florida Supervisor of Elections

Liberty County Clerk of The Court

Liberty County Emergency Management Service (EMS)

© 2017, Liberty County Florida Chamber Of Commerce |    john warren, llc